Monthly Archives: February 2010

For Jeff

I had a friend in high school named Jeff Freeman. He was a sweet boy I’d known for years. We were in school together K-12, I think. We rode the bus together and our families swam at the same pool … Continue reading

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Ellsberg’s Advice to Kissinger: Does knowledge impact how we perceive others?

<a href="http://motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2010/02/daniel-ellsberg-limitations-knowledge “>Ellsberg’s Advice to Kissinger: Does knowledge impact how we perceive others? This article is fascinating to me on several levels: 1. Watergate I’ve always been fascinated by this incident and time period in American history. I’ve written papers … Continue reading

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"Warning: cape will not enable child to fly" & other thoughts on high risk childhood activities

“Warning: cape will not enable child to fly” & other thoughts on high risk childhood activities I’m not exactly sure what happened to common sense. Was it somehow lost in the haze of ’60s &’70s drug culture? Or did ’80s … Continue reading

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Do our organs have memories?

Do our organs have memories? This is a really intriguing article. We know that we think with our heads. We know that our memories (short-term & long-term) are somehow contained in our brain tissue. While living with this fascinating mystery … Continue reading

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The Upside to Depression

The Upside to Depression I am intrigued by this perspective on depression. I believe I have personally found it to be true and have also observed it in others. I have a little card on a bulletin board in my … Continue reading

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Prior to the age of five, children appear to experience time in a different manner. They are perfectly capable of ‘forgetting’ events that they experienced a minute ago, as well as their mental state when the experience occurred. They seem to think associatively, closer perhaps to the hypnagogic state that one drifts into just before falling asleep, than to one that is ordered around a timeline with a past, present, and future. Gopnik attempts to penetrate what this different form of consciousness is like. She describes a ‘false belief’ experiment in which children see a closed candy box that, in fact, is filled with pencils: ‘The children are understandably both surprised and disappointed by this discovery. But then we asked what they thought was in the box when they first saw it. Although they had discovered the truth with great surprise only moments before, they still said that they had always known the box was full of pencils. They had entirely forgotten their earlier false belief.’ This is why young children are so perilously suggestible, and their testimony, in most cases, should be inadmissible in court. They have excellent detailed memories when they are cued to remember a specific event with a leading question, but free recall is alien to them because it is dependent on an internal consciousness that they don’t yet fully possess.

Prior to the age of five, children appear to experience time in a different manner. They are perfectly capable of ‘forgetting’ events that they experienced a minute ago, as well as their mental state when the experience occurred. They seem … Continue reading

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into the desert . . .

“Your journey begins on February 15, 2010.” Wow. Sounds like Star Trek. Or a ride at Disney World. I’m intrigued. On this (Follow) Friday, I’d like to offer you a blog that I just discovered today. That’s a bit risky. … Continue reading

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